Scientists today (09/11/14) unveiled what appears to be the first truly semiaquatic dinosaur, Spinosaurus aegyptiacus. New fossils of the massive Cretaceous-era predator reveal it adapted to life in the water some 95 million years ago. The new Spinosaurus fossils were discovered in the Moroccan Sahara along desert cliffs known as the Kem Kem beds. This area was once a large river system, stretching from present-day Morocco to Egypt.

Scientists today (09/11/14) unveiled what appears to be the first truly semiaquatic dinosaur, Spinosaurus aegyptiacus. New fossils of the massive Cretaceous-era predator reveal it adapted to life in the water some 95 million years ago. The new Spinosaurus fossils were discovered in the Moroccan Sahara along desert cliffs known as the Kem Kem beds. This area was once a large river system, stretching from present-day Morocco to Egypt.

(Source: sciencedaily.com)

paleontology science news science daily Spinosaurus adaptations

I’m in London! 

for the next 2 weeks it’s tea, friends, tea, ignoring work emails, all the museums, and biscuits to go with my tea. 

me london tea england

Five million years ago, sea levels rose, flooding East Antarctica and forming a salty lake. Millions of years later, glaciers formed on top of the lake, cutting it off from the rest of the continent—meaning that the water in Blood Falls is something of an aqueous time capsule, preserved 400 meters underground. As the glaciers on top of the lake began to freeze, the water below became even saltier, three times saltier than seawater and too salty to freeze. The subglacial lake that feeds Blood Falls is trapped beneath a quarter mile of ice.

Blood Falls is completely cut off from the atmosphere—it has never seen sunlight, is completely devoid of oxygen, and also extremely rich in iron. When water from the subglacial lake seeps through a fissure in the glacier, the salty water cascades down the Taylor Glacier into Lake Bonney below. When the iron-rich water comes into contact with the air, it rusts—depositing blood red stains on the ice as it falls.

(Source: smithsonianmag.com)

science news oceans glaciers blood rivers lakes smithsonian museums antarctica geology

Icheon Master Hand

The American Museum of Ceramic Art is honored to present ICHEON: Reviving the Korean Ceramics tradition, an unprecedented exhibition organized by Icheon, South Korea. Icheon has a history of ceramic culture that began over 5000 years ago and has a reputation for its internationally renowned ceramics cultural events.

art ceramics Museums American Museum of Ceramic Art wow pottery wheel thrown

Weighing the Milky Way: Researchers devise precise method for calculating the mass of galaxies

Using a new, more accurate method for measuring the mass of galaxies that includes collecting information about the distances between the Milky Way, Andromeda and other close-by galaxies, an international group of researchers has shown that the Milky Way has half the Mass of the Andromeda Galaxy. 
By studying both the galaxies in and immediately outside the Local Group, Walker was able to pinpoint the group’s center. The researchers then calculated the mass of both the ordinary, visible matter and the invisible dark matter throughout both galaxies based on each galaxy’s present location within the Local Group. Andromeda had twice as much mass as the Milky Way, and in both galaxies 90 percent of the mass was made up of dark matter.

Weighing the Milky Way: Researchers devise precise method for calculating the mass of galaxies

Using a new, more accurate method for measuring the mass of galaxies that includes collecting information about the distances between the Milky Way, Andromeda and other close-by galaxies, an international group of researchers has shown that the Milky Way has half the Mass of the Andromeda Galaxy. 

By studying both the galaxies in and immediately outside the Local Group, Walker was able to pinpoint the group’s center. The researchers then calculated the mass of both the ordinary, visible matter and the invisible dark matter throughout both galaxies based on each galaxy’s present location within the Local Group. Andromeda had twice as much mass as the Milky Way, and in both galaxies 90 percent of the mass was made up of dark matter.

(Source: sciencedaily.com)

science news space NASA Milky Way Galaxy stars planets matter dark matter Andromeda