Wolf-Rayet Star 124: Stellar Wind Machine 
Some stars explode in slow motion. Rare, massive Wolf-Rayet stars are so tumultuous and hot that they slowly disintegrating right before our telescopes. Glowing gas globs each typically over 30 times more massive than the Earth are being expelled by violent stellar winds. Wolf-Rayet star WR 124, visible near the above image center spanning six light years across, is thus creating the surrounding nebula known as M1-67.

Wolf-Rayet Star 124: Stellar Wind Machine 

Some stars explode in slow motion. Rare, massive Wolf-Rayet stars are so tumultuous and hot that they slowly disintegrating right before our telescopes. Glowing gas globs each typically over 30 times more massive than the Earth are being expelled by violent stellar windsWolf-Rayet star WR 124, visible near the above image center spanning six light years across, is thus creating the surrounding nebula known as M1-67.

(Source: apod.nasa.gov)

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sci-universe:

Zooming into the constellation Sagittarius.

Images:
1. A region of the Milky Way
2. A large portion of the sky very rich in nebulae and star clusters. For example the Lagoon, Trifid, Eagle and Omega nebulae are seen.
3. The field around the Lagoon and Trifid nebulae
4. The finest details of the Lagoon and Trifid nebulae. M8, an emission nebulae, lies at the left.
5. Close-up look of M20 where the three different types of nebula can be seen
.

Credit: the members of the IAC astrophotography group.

(via sagansense)

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New colorful view of the universe from Hubble

Using ultraviolet light, astronomers have combined the full range of colors available to Hubble, stretching all the way from ultraviolet to near-infrared light. The resulting image — made from 841 orbits of telescope viewing time — contains approximately 10,000 galaxies, extending back in time to within a few hundred million years of the big bang.

New colorful view of the universe from Hubble

Using ultraviolet light, astronomers have combined the full range of colors available to Hubble, stretching all the way from ultraviolet to near-infrared light. The resulting image — made from 841 orbits of telescope viewing time — contains approximately 10,000 galaxies, extending back in time to within a few hundred million years of the big bang.

(Source: sciencedaily.com)

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Cosmic inflation: ‘Spectacular’ discovery hailed

Scientists say they have extraordinary new evidence to support a Big Bang Theory for the origin of the Universe.
Researchers believe they have found the signal left in the sky by the super-rapid expansion of space that must have occurred just fractions of a second after everything came into being. It takes the form of a distinctive twist in the oldest light detectable with telescopes. read more

Cosmic inflation: ‘Spectacular’ discovery hailed

Scientists say they have extraordinary new evidence to support a Big Bang Theory for the origin of the Universe.

Researchers believe they have found the signal left in the sky by the super-rapid expansion of space that must have occurred just fractions of a second after everything came into being. It takes the form of a distinctive twist in the oldest light detectable with telescopes. read more

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About 40,000 light-years across, spiral galaxy M83, or the Thousand-Ruby Galaxy, lies a mere twelve million light-years away, near the southeastern tip of the very long constellation Hydra. 

Captured via Hubble, along with ground based data from the European Southern Observatory’s very large telescope units, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan’s Subaru telescope, and Australian Astronomical Observatory photographic data by D. Malin.

About 40,000 light-years across, spiral galaxy M83, or the Thousand-Ruby Galaxy, lies a mere twelve million light-years away, near the southeastern tip of the very long constellation Hydra.

Captured via Hubble, along with ground based data from the European Southern Observatory’s very large telescope units, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan’s Subaru telescope, and Australian Astronomical Observatory photographic data by D. Malin.

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