The details of how mice burrow appear to be driven by genetics and not through learning, researchers report.


The study’s key subjects were more than 300 oilfield mice (Peromyscus polionotus), which are known to make burrows into the ground toward a nest, and then an “escape route” from the nest to just below the surface, which they can break through easily in the case of danger.
They were cross-bred with deer mice, a closely related species (P maniculatus) that is known to make shorter burrows, without the extra escape route.
The two species of mice were successively bred, and those hybrids built long, two-tunnel burrows like oilfield mice - showing that the behaviour is a “dominant” trait. read more 

The details of how mice burrow appear to be driven by genetics and not through learning, researchers report.

The study’s key subjects were more than 300 oilfield mice (Peromyscus polionotus), which are known to make burrows into the ground toward a nest, and then an “escape route” from the nest to just below the surface, which they can break through easily in the case of danger.

They were cross-bred with deer mice, a closely related species (P maniculatus) that is known to make shorter burrows, without the extra escape route.

The two species of mice were successively bred, and those hybrids built long, two-tunnel burrows like oilfield mice - showing that the behaviour is a “dominant” trait. read more 

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shitsaidatoutreach:

boy: so…how many things have you personally cloned? 

me: um, well none actually, I’m not that kind of scientist

boy: but I thought you were a scientist, and plus you work at a science place

me: well yes, but there are very specific scientists who study cloning

boy: hmm, so you are a scientist, but you don’t clone anything…you don’t sound like a scientist

science kids genetics scientists cloning